Review: Cheng Yi’s Yi River Commentary of the Book of Changes

The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes
by Cheng Yi, edited and translated by L. Michael Harrington
Introduction by L. Michael Harrington and Robin R. Wang
Yale University Press, 2019
ISBN: 9780300218077
Hardcover, 576 pages
$85 USD

Cheng Yi (1033–1107) lived during the Song dynasty, and was one of the era’s great thinkers. His Yijing work greatly influenced subsequent generations. L. Michael Harrington, a professor of philosophy, includes an introduction (written with colleague Robin Wang), notes on Cheng’s quotations of other material, extensive glossary, and a thorough index.  Harrington and Wang give a succinct overview of Cheng’s thoughts and his influence on subsequent generations, including our own. They note an important feature of Cheng’s commentary, that it offers full discussion of the hexagram components, rather than snippets of explanation and terse definitions appearing in in other commentaries. In addition, Cheng creates a “coherent conceptual structure: the principle that governs the interaction between different capacities and functions in any state of affairs.”

Understanding the Yijing is difficult, thus the need for commentaries such as Cheng Yi’s–which was by then already a 2000-year-old book. Translating the Yijing is also a difficult task, and Harrington clearly describes methods used in his effort to see the Yijing through Cheng’s eyes. He explains translation choices, as well. One interesting choice, for example, is the name “Ebb” for Hexagram 59 渙, which is “Dispersion/Dissolution” in the classic Wilhelm/Baynes I Ching.

The Yi River Commentary is an excellent companion to I Ching editions of Richard Wilhelm (translated by Cary Baynes), and by Wang Bi (translated by Richard John Lynn). These are all dependable translations that introduce readers to particular strains of Yijing interpretations. In Cheng’s presentation, we can, inparticular, see the roots of Richard Wilhelm’s work eight centuries later, both using a “teaching voice” that seeks to engage the student in depth.

Avid Yijing readers will undoubtedly want to compare this translation of Cheng Yi’s work to others. Harrington’s is a model of transparency, detailing sources, methodology, and what material is included. The other English translation, by Thomas Cleary, is I Ching: The Tao of Organization. As with Cleary’s other Yijing translations, The Taoist I Ching, The Buddhist I Ching, and I Ching Mandalas  (all from Shambhala Books) he succeeds in his effort to reach an educated popular audience. However, in each he offers little clarity as to his methods or source material. In his translation of Cheng’s book, he severely edited the original material, leaving out what Harrington estimates to be more than half of Cheng’s comments, in particular, on the Ten Wings related to each hexagram. An interested reader would have to do his or her own reading of the original Chinese to find what Cleary included or omitted, nor did he indicate what of Cheng’s text is actually quotes of other material.

The Yi River Commentary is a well-made book physically, with a sturdy hardcover binding, though it weighs in at over two pounds. Unfortunately, the price for this book is set for libraries and specialists, not for the average Yijing reader, who would undoubtedly find this book of interest. The book is missing two key items for general readers: a hexagram finding chart and instructions for how to use the Yijing. Fortunately, these are easily found elsewhere.

The Yi River Commentary is highly recommended for Yijing readers who enjoy pondering the deeper meaning of this ancient book and what it meant to the philosophers of imperial China, and who may be interested in the sources of modern interpretations.

 

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Portraits of Fortunetellers

fortunetellerHong Kong is home to many fortunetellers. This article presents “The Fortune Market” a collection of portraits by photographer Kris Vervaeke of fortunetellers next to a Daoist temple.

“The fortune tellers have different backgrounds,” Vervaeke explained. “For some the job is passed on from each generation to the next within a family. Others learn it from a Master or through other means. The future of the shops is uncertain, however, as finding someone interested to take over is getting more and more difficult.” He also added that the rise of online fortune telling puts the physical institutions’ futures in jeopardy.

Divination in China Thesis

cropped-yi-hex-29-30-laiA new PhD dissertation related to the I Ching is available, “Divination And Deviation: The Problem Of Prediction And Personal Freedom In Early China” by Yunwoo Song, from the University of Pennsylvania. This interesting dissertation explores ancient methods and meaning of divination in early China through early imperial times. The dissertation can be viewed at UPenn’s site.

 

 

I Ching Diagrams Now Available

Curious about how people in past centuries envisioned the I Ching hexagrams? Visit our RESOURCES page to see some examples of charts organized by trigrams or  received order.

These handy diagrams were used to study characteristics and relationships between hexagrams, as mnemonics to help memorize hexagrams, and as hexagram finding aids.

The Nuclear Hexagram Chart by Qian Chengzhi (Qing dynasty) to the left is one example. Around the outside are the sixty-four I Ching hexagrams with their names, arranged by lower trigrams in the “Pre-heavenly” order (the same as the Fuxi/Shaoyong chart). The second ring inward are the nuclear hexagrams for the outer ring, formed from the inner four lines of the original hexagrams. The third ring repeats the process, in each case yielding one of the four “core” hexagrams.

Book Review: Yijing, Shamanic Oracle

Yijing, Shamanic Oracle of China: A New Book of Change

Richard Bertschinger, translation and commentary
Singing Dragon 2012
Hardcover/ebook, 336 pp.
US $30 / £25.00
ISBN: 978-1-84819-083-2

Yijing, Shamanic Oracle of China is a nicely presented contemplative book. Richard Bertschinger, an acupuncturist and student of  Gia-fu Feng, has done an engaging job of presenting his thoughts about the Yijing. With occasional cross-cultural philosophical comparisons, Bertschinger presents a translation of the core Zhouyi and selected Wings, enhanced with his comments, and including a helpful glossary.

“The Yijing can reveal the seeds of the future, but above all it teaches reverence for those small inklings in the present which determine the science of change. It encourages us all to be alive to the world, and take a stand on destiny.”

Bertschinger’s translation emphasizes finding one’s path. “You can transform those observing below, by observing the causes of your own life. Observe yourself within and contemplate the evens of your own life. At no time neglect to seek the middle path and at all times act properly” (from Hexagram 20).

This is a very accessible Yijing book, drawn from the author’s reading of traditional Chinese texts, accessible to beginners, but meaty enough for experienced users.

Oracle Bones Crowd-sourced

Chinese scholars are asking for help with deciphering thousands of oracle bones, and are offering rewards:
“The National Museum of Chinese Writing in Anyang, Henan province, has issued a worldwide appeal for help to decipher thousands of esoteric characters cut into bones and shells dating back more than 3,000 years to the Shang dynasty.
The inscriptions, resembling modern characters, are the earliest written records of Chin­ese civilisation and shed light on life and society at a time.
They were carved by fortune-tellers on turtle shells and ox shoulder blades known as oracle bones, and record questions on everything from weather to taxes.
So far, scholars have managed to crack the code to less than half of the roughly 5,000 characters found on excavated oracle bones. Around 3,000 of them remain a mystery.” Read the whole article here.

Yijing Research by Larry Schulz

Image result for "lai zhide"

Famed Yijing scholar Lai Zhide (Lai Chih-te, 1525–1604) of the Ming Dynasty was heralded for his in-depth investigation of the hexagram graphics and collection of a vast array of charts on the subject. His book has been in print, in many editions, continually since.

Dr. Larry Schulz wrote his dissertation on Lai, and has made his thesis “Lai Chih-te and the Phenomonolgy of the ‘Classic of Change’ (I Ching)” as well as more recent articles about the hexagram order available at his own website.

Review: A Companion to Yi Jing Numerology and Cosmology by Bent Nielsen

A Companion to Yi Jing Numerology and Cosmology: Chinese Studies of Images and Numbers from the Han (202 BCE–220 CE) to Song (960–1279 CE)

Bent Nielsen
Routledge, 2003, paper 2015
Paper, 391 pp
US$39.96
ISBN 9781138862678
Also available in hardcover and eboook

A better title for this splendid book might have been A Quite Comprehensive Encyclopedic Companion to the Yijing. Despite the focus on Han-Song dynasties, devotees of any era or type of Yijing studies will find this book invaluable. The author, Bent Nielsen, professor of Asian Studies at the University of Copenhagen, has drawn from a good range of source material in covering the many schools of Yijing thought.

The book entries cover the gamut of Yijing topics, from the towering personalities such as Wang Bi and Yu Fan, to intriguing theories such as the Six Gateways (liu men), to obscure terms like the “Hexagrams of the Returning Souls” (gui hun gua), and to numerous explanatory charts and tables. The entries are in alphabetical order in pinyin, with traditional characters and translation.

A Companion assumes a certain level of familiarity with Yijing terms. One hates to quibble about such a wonderful book, however, given all the time periods, ideas, terms, and languages involved, a thorough index with cross-references would have been a nice addition. A small example: the word jing is explained as meaning “classic,” however, there is no entry or cross-reference under “classic.” Another example: the ideas of influential Ming dynasty Yijing writer Lai Zhide (1525–1604) feature in entries such as about hexagram order (guaxu) and “laterally linked hexagrams” (pangtonggua), yet there is no entry for Lai himself, presumably because he is from a later century beyond the scope of the book. We can only hope that Nielsen or another scholar will soon tackle creating the  companion to this Companion, one that will cover pre-Han and post-Song Yijing topics.

This book is highly readable on its own, or as a companion to others. Nielsen’s work is to be commended, and the publisher is to be thanked for issuing these new, affordable paper and ebook editions.