I Ching Diagrams Now Available

Curious about how people in past centuries envisioned the I Ching hexagrams? Visit our RESOURCES page to see some examples of charts organized by trigrams or  received order.

These handy diagrams were used to study characteristics and relationships between hexagrams, as mnemonics to help memorize hexagrams, and as hexagram finding aids.

The Nuclear Hexagram Chart by Qian Chengzhi (Qing dynasty) to the left is one example. Around the outside are the sixty-four I Ching hexagrams with their names, arranged by lower trigrams in the “Pre-heavenly” order (the same as the Fuxi/Shaoyong chart). The second ring inward are the nuclear hexagrams for the outer ring, formed from the inner four lines of the original hexagrams. The third ring repeats the process, in each case yielding one of the four “core” hexagrams.

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Yijing Videos Available Online

Yijing maven Harmen Mesker has produced several Yijing videos that are now available on YouTube on his “YiTube” channel. These videos are introductions to the Yijing in general and specific topics such as the trigrams, embellished occasionally with Mesker’s sly wit. Mesker, who is based in the Netherlands, maintains an informative website, as well.

Book Review: Yijing, Shamanic Oracle

Yijing, Shamanic Oracle of China: A New Book of Change

Richard Bertschinger, translation and commentary
Singing Dragon 2012
Hardcover/ebook, 336 pp.
US $30 / £25.00
ISBN: 978-1-84819-083-2

Yijing, Shamanic Oracle of China is a nicely presented contemplative book. Richard Bertschinger, an acupuncturist and student of  Gia-fu Feng, has done an engaging job of presenting his thoughts about the Yijing. With occasional cross-cultural philosophical comparisons, Bertschinger presents a translation of the core Zhouyi and selected Wings, enhanced with his comments, and including a helpful glossary.

“The Yijing can reveal the seeds of the future, but above all it teaches reverence for those small inklings in the present which determine the science of change. It encourages us all to be alive to the world, and take a stand on destiny.”

Bertschinger’s translation emphasizes finding one’s path. “You can transform those observing below, by observing the causes of your own life. Observe yourself within and contemplate the evens of your own life. At no time neglect to seek the middle path and at all times act properly” (from Hexagram 20).

This is a very accessible Yijing book, drawn from the author’s reading of traditional Chinese texts, accessible to beginners, but meaty enough for experienced users.

I Ching-based Artwork on Display


The Book of Changes: Symbolic Landscapes of the I Ching
On view December 2nd- January 26th
Opening reception: Tuesday, December 5th from 4-6pm
64 works by Elizabeth Nelson inspired by the 64 hexagrams of the I Ching

Elizabeth Nelson is best known for her images of northeastern landscapes. Her work has been shown since the late 1980s and has been presented in juried shows for nearly as long. She is represented by galleries in New York and Vermont and has won commissions for public art. Neither a young nor obscure artist, one can believe her
when she says, “Every so often artists come to the end of what they’re exploring.” They have to ask, “Where do I go from here?” 2012 was one of those periods for Liz. She wanted to transform her work.

In January 2012, she started a series of “Symbolic Landscapes” inspired by the sixty four hexagrams of the I Ching. Incorporating chance even into the procedure, She threw coins to choose a hexagram each time a painting was started and would contemplate the result as she thought or dreamt an image. Her work has always referenced the landscape of northern New England and this new series continued that exploration, but with an interior dimension of symbols and geometric juxtapositions.

A friend showed her the book in the mid 1960s. “The language about the symbols connected so closely to unconscious thoughts I had been having.” She wears divination loosely; there are times she refers to the method frequently and times she puts it aside for years. Liz describes her use as “something I have used in different ways for different questions and in different intensities.”

The discipline of such a project is “very freeing.” Describing the freedom inside of discipline, Liz makes this analogy: “If you’ve cooked a souffle, one that’s followed the rules, and have had some success, then you start changing things.” She applies that thought to painting: “You have to keep pushing the edges of your knowledge and capabilities to grow as an artist. “Completing one idea,” she explains, gives her the “confidence to do a riff on it. It’s a physical skill, among other things. You have to have confidence in your skills; you keep practicing.”
For the first time all 64 of these new paintings will be on exhibit.
Free and open to the public. For more information, please call (802) 533-9075 or visit http://www.HighlandArtsVT.org.

Nederlands Dans Theater takes dance inspiration from ancient Chinese shamanic text, the Book of Changes

When Nederlands Dans Theater presents Safe As Houses during their Asian tour this autumn [2017], they will be following on a well-lit path of using the ancient Chinese shamanic text, the I Ching – (also known as the Yijing or in English the Book of Changes – to create an extraordinary modern dance piece.”

The director said, ‘We created a … theatrical space that also dealt with these ideas of the Book of Changes. The idea is that the stage is never still; it’s constantly altering its form. Therefore, the world around it must also go with it.’ ”
The company builds on previous works by such great choreographers as Merce Cunningham.

Read the full article in the South China Post

John Cage, Avant-Garde Musician and the I Ching

John Cage was a twentieth-century avant-garde musician who explored the edges of thinking and the arts, often using the I Ching. This lengthy review article in the Utne Reader discusses Cage’s life and own writings–his famous Silences, as well his diary and letters.

Oracle Bones Crowd-sourced

Chinese scholars are asking for help with deciphering thousands of oracle bones, and are offering rewards:
“The National Museum of Chinese Writing in Anyang, Henan province, has issued a worldwide appeal for help to decipher thousands of esoteric characters cut into bones and shells dating back more than 3,000 years to the Shang dynasty.
The inscriptions, resembling modern characters, are the earliest written records of Chin­ese civilisation and shed light on life and society at a time.
They were carved by fortune-tellers on turtle shells and ox shoulder blades known as oracle bones, and record questions on everything from weather to taxes.
So far, scholars have managed to crack the code to less than half of the roughly 5,000 characters found on excavated oracle bones. Around 3,000 of them remain a mystery.” Read the whole article here.

Yijing Research by Larry Schulz

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Famed Yijing scholar Lai Zhide (Lai Chih-te, 1525–1604) of the Ming Dynasty was heralded for his in-depth investigation of the hexagram graphics and collection of a vast array of charts on the subject. His book has been in print, in many editions, continually since.

Dr. Larry Schulz wrote his dissertation on Lai, and has made his thesis “Lai Chih-te and the Phenomonolgy of the ‘Classic of Change’ (I Ching)” as well as more recent articles about the hexagram order available at his own website.