Review: Teaching the I Ching (Book of Changes)

Teaching the I Ching (Book of Changes)
by Geoffrey Redmond and Tze-Ki Hon
Oxford University Press, 2014, $78
Hardcover, 320 pages
ISBN-13: 978-0199766819

Well-known I Ching scholar Tze-Ki Hon (author of many important research articles and a book on the I Ching’s intellectual history) has teamed up with physician Geoffrey Redmond to create this well-written and nicely formatted book. Teaching the I Ching provides a readable, thorough introduction to the Chinese Book of Changes. Ostensibly written for college professors who wish to include the I Ching in their classes, Teaching the I Ching covers a wide and thought-provoking range of topics, making the book of interest to a wide range of readers.

For anyone interested in Chinese civilization, humanities, literature, history, popular culture, or philosophy, but who does not understand the I Ching, Redmond and Hon’s book will be a welcome first step, as it surveys much of the contemporary questions being asked about the enigmatic, ancient I Ching. It even provides a short section on how to use the I Ching that can serve well in giving students a more multi-dimensional look. The book does not translate the I Ching, but rather serves as a resource. Chapters include:

Introduction: The Rewards and Perils of Studying an Ancient Classic
1. Divination
2. Bronze Age Origins
3. Women in the Yijing
4. Recently Excavated Manuscripts
5. Ancient Meanings Reconstructed
6. The Ten Wings
7. Cosmology
8. Moral Cultivation
9. The Yijing as China Enters the Modern Age
10. The Yijing’s Journey to the West
11. Reader’s Guide
12. Predicting the Future for the Yijing

A teacher preparing a unit on the Yijing can rely confidently on the material in this book. Its comprehensiveness and clarity will give a good breadth of issues and topics, with a substantial amount of depth. It can be paired with translations such as the Richard Wilhelm I Ching: Book of Changes for a complete set of material. While aimed at teachers, it is a pity that the book has such a high price; otherwise, Teaching the I Ching would have been a welcome addition to students’ reading lists. Perhaps the publisher can remedy this with a substantially cheaper softcover edition.
Highly recommended.

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